Human Resources Services
 

Job Listing - Administrators

Provost

Department: Academic Affairs
Job Number:
Date Posted: 12/19/2013
Status: Accepting applications

PROVOST
Gallaudet University
Washington, D.C.
MISSION STATEMENT

Gallaudet University, federally chartered in 1864, is a bilingual, diverse, multicultural institution of higher education that ensures the intellectual and professional advancement of deaf and hard of hearing individuals through American Sign Language (ASL) and English. Gallaudet maintains a proud tradition of research and scholarly activity and prepares its graduates for career opportunities in a highly competitive, technological, and rapidly changing world.

THE SEARCH

Gallaudet University (Gallaudet), located in our nation's capital, is a private, federally supported institution of higher education. The University has a 150-year tradition of providing deaf, hard of hearing, and hearing individuals with superior undergraduate, graduate, and professional education. Gallaudet enrolls both undergraduate and graduate students, and is also home to the Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center, which serves deaf and hard of hearing students pre-K to grade 12 and provides information and education to families and professionals working with pre-college students. It is within this context that Gallaudet seeks a provost to lead the University forward.

As Gallaudet approaches its sesquicentennial, the provost will be faced with numerous strategic challenges to further the University academically in a changing world. Gallaudet maintains a unique position as a place in which higher education, research, and scholarly pursuits of all kinds are conducted in an inclusive bilingual environment. The next provost will be a strong academic leader and effective communicator who can serve as a partner to the president. A transparent and collaborative leader, the next provost will work with all constituencies on campus to continue the implementation of a recently developed strategic plan as it relates to the internal operations of the University. The University will need to address the issue of providing services that support the recruitment and enrollment of a diverse and talented student body, successfully retaining students to graduation and providing them with the tools to become life-long learners. Furthermore, the next provost must ensure that the Gallaudet community fosters respect among students, faculty, staff, and administrators, and is moving forward in a unified way.

In adapting to the changing environment of both society and the world of higher education, the provost will need, working with the faculty, to assess and strengthen the University's educational programs, research, scholarship, and creativity. This will involve leading the institution in making decisions about focusing program directions to best serve its students within the context of a visually-oriented learning environment. The provost must also be a visionary leader to engage the changing use of technology in instruction and the every day lives of deaf individuals. Finally, the provost must consider the expansion of resource streams to support excellence in the University's educational and scholarly programs, and use these resources to effectively and efficiently maintain Gallaudet's status as the preeminent institution serving deaf and hard of hearing students.

Gallaudet seeks a leader who can bring passion for the academic mission; demonstrate the capacity to be forward-thinking; and guide change, where needed, in the institution's scholarly direction. Gallaudet's new provost must also have a high level of energy, personal integrity, and ethics to inspire the University community to new levels of excellence.

Gallaudet has formed a Provost Search Committee (PSC) comprised of members of the faculty, administration, staff, Clerc Center, and students to make recommendations to the president, who will select the new provost. The University has retained Isaacson, Miller, a national executive search firm, to assist in the recruitment of the provost. Please direct all applications, nominations, and inquiries to Isaacson, Miller as indicated at the end of this document.

HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY

In 1856, Amos Kendall, a wealthy businessman who had also served as postmaster general during two presidential administrations, donated two acres of his estate in northeast Washington, D.C. to establish housing and a school for 12 deaf and six blind students. The following year Kendall persuaded Congress to incorporate the new school, which was called the Columbia Institution for the Instruction of the Deaf and Dumb and Blind.

Edward Miner Gallaudet, the son of Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet, became the new school's first superintendent. Thomas was the founder of the first school for deaf students in the United States, the American School for the Deaf in Hartford, Connecticut. Edward's deaf mother, Sophia Fowler Gallaudet, became the Columbia Institution's matron.

In 1864, Congress authorized the institution to confer college degrees, and President Abraham Lincoln signed the bill into law. President Gallaudet presided over the first commencement in June 1869, when three young men received diplomas for having completed the entire four-year course of studies. Their diplomas were signed by President Ulysses S. Grant and, to this day, the diplomas of all Gallaudet graduates are signed by the current U.S. President. Through an act of Congress in 1954, the name of the institution was formally changed to Gallaudet College in honor of Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet.

In 1969, the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare supported the establishment of the Model Secondary School for the Deaf (MSSD) on the Gallaudet campus. A year later, President Richard Nixon signed the bill that authorized the establishment of Kendall Demonstration Elementary School (KDES). In October 1986, by an act of the U.S. Congress, the 122-year-old College was granted university status and became Gallaudet University.

UNIVERSITY VISION

Gallaudet University will build upon its rich history as the world's premier higher education institution serving deaf and hard of hearing people to become the university of first choice for the most qualified, diverse group of deaf and hard of hearing students in the world, as well as hearing students pursuing careers related to deaf and hard of hearing people. Gallaudet will empower its graduates with the knowledge and practical skills vital to achieving personal and professional success in the changing local and global communities in which they live and work. Gallaudet will also strive to become the leading international resource for research, innovation, and outreach related to deaf and hard of hearing people.
Gallaudet will achieve these outcomes through:

• A bilingual learning environment, featuring American Sign Language and English, that provides full access for all students to learning and communication;
• A commitment to excellence in learning and student service;
• A world-class campus in the nation's capital;
• Creation of a virtual campus that expands Gallaudet's reach to a broader audience of visual learners;
• An environment in which research can grow, develop, and improve the lives and knowledge of all deaf and hard of hearing people worldwide.

In 2009, Gallaudet University completed a Strategic Plan for 2010-2015. Progress is well under way towards achieving these goals, but work remains to be done. The goals identified in that plan are: Grow Gallaudet's enrollment of full-time undergraduate students, full and part-time graduate students, and continuing education students to 3,000; increase Gallaudet's six-year undergraduate graduation rate to 50%; secure a sustainable resource base through expanded and diversified funding partnerships and increased efficiency of operations; refine a core set of undergraduate and graduate programs that, aligned with the institutional mission and vision, leverage Gallaudet's many strengths and best position students for career success; and establish Gallaudet as the epicenter of research, development and outreach leading to advancements in knowledge and practice for deaf and hard of hearing people and all of humanity. Further information about the strategic plan can be found at:
http://www.gallaudet.edu/office_of_the_president/strategic_plan/goals_and_strategies.html

UNIVERSITY CAMPUS

The historic campus of Gallaudet University, located in our nation's capital, Washington, D.C., is in a park-like atmosphere referred to as Kendall Green. Listed in the National Register of Historic Places, the campus features architecture dating back to the early 1800s and beautiful grounds. It consists of several academic and administrative buildings, including a student center and an auditorium, as well as seven residence halls. While separate from the higher education academic area, the campus also houses the Kendall Demonstration Elementary School and the Model Secondary School for the Deaf. In addition, the Gallaudet University Kellogg Conference Hotel has 93 guest rooms and 17,000 square feet of conference space. Since 1992, Gallaudet has constructed five buildings and renovated 21 others. This includes on-campus improvements such as the historic Peikoff Alumni House renovation; the construction of the James Lee Sorenson Language and Communication Center; and the construction of the Living and Learning Residence Hall (LLRH6), completed in Fall 2012, amongst many other changes. LLRH6 was constructed as an extensive example of DeafSpace concepts. The Gallaudet 2022 Campus Plan articulates the university's vision for the campus and provides guidance for the physical development of campus facilities. Details can be found here: http://www.gallaudet.edu/campus_design/2022_campus_plan.html.

Gallaudet has a long, positive history of involvement with local community residents and organizations. Being a good neighbor has been at the heart of Gallaudet University since Amos Kendall opened up his home to local orphaned deaf children in 1856. During the Civil War, the campus housed federal troops and was used as a hospital for Union troops. In 1968, following the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., U.S. troops from Pennsylvania bivouacked on campus.

The University's location in Washington provides access to a plethora of museums, libraries, archives, and other opportunities for cultural activity, research, and internships, as well as being in the center of national policy activity. Over 35 years ago, the University established the Gallaudet Community Relations Council, which is made up of business and community leaders from the surrounding northeast D.C. area. The Council is one of the oldest university-community relations organizations in the country. The robust "NoMA" area and surrounding neighborhoods near Gallaudet are experiencing significant physical change and economic development.

Opportunities for faculty, student, and staff partnership and engagement exist as the neighborhood continues to evolve.

Today, Gallaudet has a program that allows residents of the neighborhood to register and use the University's outdoor sports facilities, supports local not-for-profit organization programs by offering the use of space in its physical plant, and encourages service-learning and voluntary student community service.

Renewing their commitment to a sustainable campus, in February 2012, Gallaudet was one of nine universities in the District of Columbia to sign the District of Columbia Mayor's College and University Sustainability Pledge (CUSP). A compact between the higher education sector and the local government to advance sustainability, the pledge is an agreement to pursue a myriad of sustainability measures related to energy use and buildings, green education, transportation, waste reduction, grounds maintenance, purchasing, and the management and reporting of progress. The most recently completed residence hall on campus utilized construction and design strategies to obtain a LEED Silver certification. Additionally, the 2022 Campus Plan is guided by principles of sustainability, as Gallaudet strives to be a "green" campus.

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENT BODY

In the fall of 2012, 1,674 undergraduate and graduate students were enrolled at Gallaudet University: 1,117 undergraduate students, 463 graduate students, and 94 in the English Language Institute/Consortium. Additionally, there were 147 students enrolled in Professional Studies Activities. International students comprise six percent of the student body. Fall 2012 enrollment at the demonstration schools was 94 students at KDES and 150 at MSSD.

There is considerable diversity in the student body, with 34 percent of the undergraduates being from traditionally underrepresented groups in Fall 2012. Among the graduate degree-seeking student population, 21 percent are from underrepresented groups. The undergraduate student body has a small population of hearing students, while the graduate student population includes a slight majority of hearing students. Virtually every state in the United States is represented in the student body.

The persistence and graduation rate of graduate students is excellent, with 81 percent continuing year-to-year and a 72 percent graduation rate in 2011. Increasing retention and graduation rates are key goals of the strategic plan and continue to be a focus for the institution's leadership. Significant steps have been taken to bring the 6-year graduation rate for baccalaureate degrees up to 50 percent, and this will continue to be a priority. The 2005 undergraduate cohort had a graduation rate of 41 percent. This is up from 35 percent for the 2004 cohort.

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

The Division of Academic Affairs, led by the provost, is comprised of the College of Arts and Sciences; the School of Education, Business, and Human Services; Research, Graduate School, Continuing Studies and International Programs; Student Affairs and Academic Support; Office of Academic Quality and Planning; Office for Diversity and Inclusion; Gallaudet University Library; Gallaudet University Library Deaf Collections and Archives; Regional and National Outreach; and the Registrar.

The University and its Clerc Center have over 950 employees, 50 percent of whom are deaf or hard of hearing. A total of 236 employees are faculty members or teaching staff. The faculty and staff are committed to providing the highest quality liberal and professional education through the undergraduate and graduate programs offered. They are committed to pursuing excellence in research, pedagogy, scholarship, and creative activity.

During FY 2012, the Division of Academic Affairs began planning for a new organizational structure consistent with the recommendations from a variety of task forces that included representatives from all areas of campus. A major undertaking led by the outgoing provost, the 2012-2013 academic year saw many of the changes implemented. Recruitments for some of the resulting leadership positions have been completed. Others will be completed under the new provost. Additions to course offerings include pre-professional programs in business, health care, law, and architecture that are not majors, but rather recommended course sequences with advising and related activities. Additionally, a new master's degree program in public administration designed for deaf, hard of hearing, and hearing professionals working in local, state, or federal government agencies admitted its first students for fall 2012.

Gallaudet University is a leader in liberal arts education with a particular focus on communication, collaboration, and innovative thinking. A focus on liberal arts and creative thinking is especially important as more tools for accessibility have become available. Given Gallaudet's strength in visual communications, there are natural paths and areas of potential pursuit that will both fit with University tradition and serve to expand ways of learning. Given the needs of Gallaudet students and the deaf community nationally, the University has moved in the direction of utilizing the advantages of technology to enhance the educational efforts in the classroom, in co-curricular activities, and through on-line education. Gallaudet sees the many advantages technology presents for expanding the approaches a visually oriented community can use to further education, development of knowledge, and the dissemination of information. The same technology that allows students to communicate with friends, whether they are on campus or traveling around the world, also presents opportunities for Gallaudet to ensure paths of communication among academic peers and instructors, regardless of whether they are located in the same classroom or interacting from remote sites. Gallaudet is committed to using new technologies to expand its reach so that its students, alumni, and deaf and hard of hearing constituents have multiple ways of accessing materials. The new provost will lead conversations around continuing the advancement of technology use on campus.

Through its 18 academic departments, Gallaudet offers its undergraduate students the opportunity to major in more than 31 subject areas and to minor in more than 30 subject areas running the gamut from the traditional arts and sciences to fields in business, education, technology, and programs related to the deaf community. Gallaudet offers doctoral programs in Critical Studies in the Education of Deaf Learners; Hearing, Speech and Language Sciences; Interpretation; Linguistics; Clinical Psychology; and Educational Neuroscience as well as a range of master's degrees in ASL and Deaf Studies; teaching and education; psychology, counseling, social work, public administration, international development; and areas related to speech-language pathology, deaf studies, interpretation, and linguistics.

In addition, Gallaudet is also one of 13 institutional members of the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area. Among many other benefits, this allows students from Gallaudet to take classes at other Washington area institutions and to use their library facilities.

RESEARCH

The Gallaudet Research Institute (GRI) strives to fulfill the University's legislated obligation to support and conduct research, and disseminate findings, on topics of concern to deaf people and those who live, work with, and educate them. To this end, GRI aspires to stimulate students, faculty, and staff in pursuit of new knowledge valuable to their scholarly growth and to their discipline by supporting on-campus research and lectures. GRI researchers conduct studies of language and learning processes in American Sign Language and English among deaf people from diverse cultural and educational backgrounds. The GRI continues its long tradition as the preeminent source of demographic and educational data about deaf youth throughout the United States. Additionally, GRI's research scientists and associates contribute to studies conducted by other campus research centers and to institutional research conducted by the Office of Academic Quality.

Gallaudet faculty is known nationally for research related to understanding deaf and hard of hearing people for the purpose of enhancing education and quality of life issues. In FY 2012 Gallaudet received $6.2 million in research funding.

The Technology Access Program (TAP) conducts research related to communication technologies and services, with the goal of producing knowledge useful to industry, government, and deaf and hard of hearing consumers in the quest for equality in communications. The program provides education to Gallaudet students through coursework and mentored research projects related to TAP's research mission.

Supporting over 30 interdisciplinary research projects, the Visual Language and Visual Learning Center (VL2) is one of six Science Learning Centers funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The Center was established to gain a greater understanding of the biological, cognitive, linguistic, socio-cultural, and pedagogical conditions that influence the acquisition of language and knowledge through the visual modality. A member of the VL2 Center, the Brain and Language Laboratory (BL2) features one of the world's most advanced brain imaging systems. The BL2 is the site of neuroimaging and behavioral studies that will provide knowledge about the biological mechanisms and environmental factors which together make possible the human capacity to learn and convey language, achieve reading mastery, and become a skilled bilingual.

Gallaudet is also a partner in two research centers/projects sponsored by The Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (RERC). RERC is a national project funded by the United States Department of Education, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) in the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services (OSERS). RERC on Hearing Enhancement conducts research, development, and training programs that promote technological solutions to problems confronting people with hearing loss. RERC on Telecommunication Access conducts research and development projects focused on new telecollaboration systems and technologies.

In addition, Gallaudet's faculty serve as principal investigators for other significant grant funded projects and related training programs in varied departments, including Linguistics, Biology, Communication Studies, Psychology, and Education, to name a few. Examples of current projects include "Development of Biomodal Bilingualism"; "S-STEM Scholars: Overcoming Barriers to STEM Success for Deaf Undergraduates"; "The 2013-14 Eisenhower Transportation Fellowship Program"; "Widening the Bottleneck: Preparing Highly Qualified Diverse Dean Minority Teachers for Deaf/Hard of Hearing School Age Children"; and "EXP: Collaborative Research: Accommodations for Dean Children in Planetariums with Full-dome Capability."

A searchable database of research and scholarly projects, with funding sources, is available at http://research.gallaudet.edu/ara.

THE CLERC CENTER

Unique to Gallaudet University, and one of the University's hallmarks, the Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center provides information, training, and technical assistance for parents and professionals to meet the needs of children who are deaf or hard of hearing. The mission of the Clerc Center is to improve the quality of education afforded to deaf and hard of hearing students from birth to age 21 throughout the United States. The Clerc Center also maintains two demonstration schools, the Kendall Demonstration Elementary School and the Model Secondary School for the Deaf.

The Clerc Center has been mandated by Congress in the Education of the Deaf Act to provide information, training, and technical assistance for parents and personnel throughout the nation to meet the needs of children who are deaf or hard of hearing with a broad spectrum of needs. The Clerc Center provides experiential opportunities for Gallaudet students to serve as interns, student teachers, practicum students, and volunteers at Kendall Demonstration Elementary School (KDES) and the Model Secondary School for the Deaf (MSSD). In addition, the Clerc Center is expected to establish and publish priorities for research, development, and demonstration. It is also expected to maintain exemplary elementary and secondary educational programs and to develop, evaluate, and disseminate innovative curricula, materials, instructional techniques, and strategies that can be used in various educational environments. The Clerc Center and Gallaudet University continue to seek opportunities to collaborate in aforementioned areas such as research, curriculum, and instruction.

STUDENT LIFE AND INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS

Gallaudet University offers its students campus activities through participation in one of the 28 clubs and organizations offered by the Office of Campus Activities. In addition, the University offers community service as well as health and wellness programs. Gallaudet currently has six residence halls offering on-campus living for students. The staff at the University works together with residents to provide a sense of community through educational programs and common living arrangements. Students may opt to live in theme communities such as Sports and Recreation or Leadership. Communities in the residence halls encourage residents to interact in a socially and educationally supportive environment with those having common interests and goals on the same floor or wing. In addition, the University provides facilities for commuting students through the Commuter Programs. There is a commuter lounge for students who choose to live off-campus but need a place on-campus to rest, study, complete homework, and access technology. There are secure lockers available for commuting students as well.

Opportunities for diverse and interesting internship experiences abound in the D.C. region, and over 80 percent of Gallaudet students complete an internship. All but two departments require these experiences for graduation. The University helps identify and facilitate these experiences by opening doors and providing interpreters where needed.

With the goal of utilizing intercollegiate athletics as a means to reach and draw together the University community, alumni, and deaf and hard of hearing people, and to provide a source of institutional pride, the Gallaudet athletic program maintains a strong tradition of intercollegiate sports. Through six sports for men and seven sports for women, the University involves a significant proportion of the student body. The University also offers a robust intramural program for those students who would not otherwise be able to or desire to compete at the varsity level. Gallaudet's many facilities include the field house, swimming pool, tennis courts, and Hotchkiss Field. The Gallaudet Bison, the campus mascot, and Gallaudet's intercollegiate and intramural athletic program encourage athletic competitiveness and academic integrity.

ALUMNI AND FUNDRAISING

The Gallaudet University Alumni Association (GUAA) was founded in 1889 and represents both the University and its alumni through its network of more than 21,000 alumni who live across the United States and around the world. Currently, there are more than 7,000 Life Members and 53 chapters. The GUAA established a Centennial Fund in 1961 to aid deaf people in pursuing post-graduate work at non-deaf institutions, to promote cultural enrichment among the deaf community, and to support the on-going maintenance of the Alumni House. In addition, the GUAA has a number of designated and endowed funds.

At the end of FY 2012 the University's endowment was approximately $160 million. In FY 2012, the University received approximately $6.2 million in contributions. Nearly 20 percent of alumni gave in FY 2012.

UNIVERSITY BUDGET

Gallaudet is a private university that receives a substantial proportion of its income by direct appropriation from the federal government under the authority of the Education for the Deaf Act. This support has placed the university in a positive position financially despite recent fiscal stresses. The physical plant has been well maintained and there are no major deferred maintenance issues.

Gallaudet's FY 2014 operating budget is approximately $166.6 million. About 2/3 of the University's operating revenue ($111.3 million) is derived from Gallaudet's federal appropriation. The remainder of the University's revenue is comprised of tuition and fees ($16.8 million), grants and contracts ($5.6 million), investment income for operations ($7.2 million), auxiliary enterprises ($21.4 million), contributions ($3.0 million) and other income ($1.3 million). About one-third of the University's budget, $52.5 million, is allocated to areas in the provost's division and supports the colleges, the libraries, student affairs, academic support, the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, and the Office of Academic Quality. About $46.3 million of the provost's budget reflects payroll expense.

The University continues to deal with financial pressures wrought by the economic downturn and declines in federal funding. As a result of sequestration, Gallaudet's current federal appropriation is $6.1 million less than it was in FY 2012. To balance the budget, the University has reduced spending while seeking to protect the Gallaudet Strategic Plan and the Clerc Center Strategic Plan. The University budgeting process has addressed these challenges and continues to evolve with a focus on integrating planning, budgeting, and assessment. The University Planning and Budget Committee, made up of faculty, staff, and administrators from across the institution, serves in an advisory role with respect to Gallaudet's planning, resource allocation, and assessment. The committee is a shared governance mechanism for planning and budgeting, and advises the president on the development of the operating budget, changes in tuition and fees, employee salary increases, and proposals for requests of federal funds. The president accepts or amends the committee's recommendations and transmits them to the Board for approval. The Budget Oversight Group, whose membership consists of a subset of the president's cabinet, including the provost, is directly responsible for carrying out budget recommendations, reviewing policy decisions, and monitoring execution of the budget.

The annual tuition and fees for full-time U.S. students in FY 2014 is $13,424 for undergraduates and $14,744 for graduate students. Room and board is additional. After applying institutional aid, as well as other discounts, Gallaudet is highly affordable. Gallaudet was recently selected by U.S. News & World Reports as the number one Best Value School—Regional University (North)—in its 2014 ranking. The University has recently engaged a consultant to assist in evaluating the effectiveness of its current financial aid strategies and to aid in re-configuring its aid packages to optimize enrollment and net tuition.

THE ROLE

The provost reports to the president and serves on the president's cabinet, providing counsel on matters across the University. S/he serves as the academic leader of the institution, providing direction to all areas of the Division of Academic Affairs. The provost is responsible for leading the faculty in developing excellence for a learning community engaged in scholarly inquiry that addresses the needs of a diverse student body; promoting the highest levels of student engagement; and the preparation of Gallaudet's graduates for careers in a highly competitive, technological, and rapidly changing world.

As the leader of the academic enterprise, working closely with staff and the faculty in a spirit of shared governance, the provost provides guidance in the development of university-wide strategic plan and assumes responsibility for implementation. In setting strategic directions, the provost aids the faculty in the establishment of research foci, ensuring the institution's unique responsibility and commitment to research and scholarship benefiting the deaf and hard of hearing population on campus, across the United States, and internationally. Additionally, the provost provides leadership to faculty and staff for accreditation of university programs.

Recognizing that the students' academic experience is not limited to the classroom, the provost provides leadership and works to integrate all areas of the co-curricular student life programs and services, including among others, advising, athletics, placement, mental health, disabilities, housing, and tutoring. S/he also maintains a focus on enrollment and retention to ensure the university meets its goals in these areas.

Reflecting the recent reorganization within Academic Affairs, the provost has 10 direct reports: the Associate Provost, Diversity and Inclusion; Associate Provost for Research and Dean, Graduate School, Continuing Studies and International Programs; Associate Provost for Planning, Academic Quality and Institutional Research; Dean, College of Arts and Sciences; Dean, School of Education, Business and Human Services; Dean, Student Affairs and Academic Support; Registrar; Director, Regional and National Outreach; Director, Library Public Services; and Director, Library Deaf Collections and Archives.

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

The new provost of Gallaudet University will join the institution at an important juncture for the University and for the deaf and hard of hearing community. On a campus that has seen recent significant changes in organization, priorities, and staffing, the University is looking for a provost that can partner effectively with the president, cabinet, faculty, and staff to continue moving the University forward in these resource-confined times. Technology and a greater acceptance of personal differences in the hearing community have led to changes in the education of deaf and hard of hearing students. Gallaudet has the opportunity to both shape these trends and continue its history as an innovator. Gallaudet's next provost, and the leadership s/he provides, will have a major impact on the role the University plays in the education of deaf and hard of hearing students in the future. The major challenges and opportunities Gallaudet sees for the next provost include:

In partnership with faculty, staff, and administrators, shape and advance the University's academic priorities in a focused manner.

Administrators, faculty, and staff recently completed a comprehensive review of the University's departmental and programmatic offerings, which led to consolidation and reprioritization exercises. Many of the identified actions have been implemented as a result, but work remains to be done in unifying the campus communities behind these changes. Many of the identified priorities, such as the development and growth of the pre-professional programs, will require focused energy and faculty buy-in to insure success. The provost will lead the continued implementation of these changes by building support throughout the various constituencies on campus and partnering accordingly to produce results and improve institutional effectiveness.

Effectively lead the Division of Academic Affairs, managing the needs of both faculty and staff.

The provost serves as visible leader to all of the faculty and a large number of the staff on campus, leading a complex internal division of Gallaudet that encompasses all of academic and student affairs. Although these areas are naturally complementary in their mission to serve students, the priorities are sometimes in competition with one another. Gallaudet has faculty and staff who are uniquely committed to the mission of the institution and seek a provost who can embrace and capitalize on this commitment to build a strong, unified, and mutually supportive team. To this end, the provost will support various forms of professional development in order to attract, advance, and retain an excellent and diverse faculty and workforce. Additionally, the provost will serve as a persuasive advocate for faculty and staff while always keeping the needs of the institution as a whole as a priority.

Lead the Gallaudet community in the successful operation of a bilingual campus.

Critical to its recent and future identity, Gallaudet is a bilingual campus. Members of the campus community recognize that it is important to be able to communicate effectively in both ASL and written English. As some members of the campus community arrive at Gallaudet with varying levels of fluency, the campus needs to determine how best to ensure that there are adequate means for all to become fluent in both languages. It is expected that the next provost will be a leader in this continuing discussion and appropriate implementations.

Partner with campus constituencies and external organizations to increase revenue streams in a time of limited resources.

Gallaudet has been fortunate to have a steady stream of appropriated funding from the federal government. Unfortunately, that appropriation has been shrinking and the University has been forced to diversify funding to ensure long term stability. As the world around Gallaudet changes, the provost will be responsible for ensuring programs are built that will enjoy high demand and attract talented students. A provost who is creative, thinks long term, and is up to date on trends in higher education can capitalize on Gallaudet's existing strengths in online education and the utilization of technology to create new revenue streams. S/he will embrace opportunities to partner with external agencies, organizations, and consortia to capitalize on Gallaudet's unique brand and generate new sources of revenue. Additionally, s/he will foster an environment of entrepreneurialism that encourages faculty and staff engagement in these activities and the exploration of other new revenue streams consistent with institutional goals.

Support efforts to increase new student enrollment and improve retention and graduation rates.

As the trends in deaf and hard of hearing student education at the primary and secondary levels have changed, with a lower proportion of deaf students educated in schools dedicated specifically to their needs, Gallaudet University has suffered from a decrease in applications and enrollment. At the same time, many more deaf students are being sought and welcomed by colleges and universities across the country. In addition, student retention and success to degree is below a desirable level. Recently, new enrollment systems have been put into place to insure that Gallaudet is competing for an excellent and diverse student body. The Division of Academic Affairs will provide an environment of academic rigor and robust co-curricular programs that attract and retain a talented student population.

Ensure a culture of respect on campus that fosters a welcoming atmosphere for people from diverse backgrounds.

Gallaudet faces the challenge, not unlike most institutions of higher education, of being a warm and welcoming community supportive of students, faculty, and staff in a range of areas including, but not limited to racial, ethnic, and gender differences, sexual orientation, and scholarly approaches. The provost will be expected to set the appropriate tone of inclusivity to foster community and ensure the development of an atmosphere on-campus that is hospitable to people of all backgrounds. In addition, Gallaudet diversity includes linguistic differences. As new technology, including computers and the internet, PDAs, video phones, and cochlear implants, has become available, the landscape for communications in the deaf and hard of hearing community has been altered. It is critical that the provost be a visible leader supporting an atmosphere that respects and appreciates all choices of communication.

PROFESSIONAL AND PERSONAL QUALITIES

Gallaudet University seeks in its new provost a leader, proficient in ASL, with a world view, the capacity to be forward thinking and lead change, extraordinary energy, and the extremely high level of personal integrity and ethics to inspire the University community to new levels of excellence. Candidates should have a history of organizational leadership, a capacity to build and cultivate financial support for the University and its programs, and accomplishments in creating and supporting a climate of community, understanding, integrity, and mutual respect. While no one candidate will possess all of them, the best candidates will bring many of the following qualifications and attributes:

• Possesses an earned doctorate or terminal degree and a record of scholarship, teaching, and service within higher education commensurate with appointment to full professor;
• Demonstrated ability to develop and articulate a detailed and compelling vision and the charisma and talent for effectively communicating this vision to University's constituents;
• Broad managerial skills and experience; detail oriented; a proven record of sound fiscal, organizational, and management practice;
• Proficiency in ASL with the ability to communicate clearly with deaf, hard of hearing, and hearing audiences; a deep understanding of deaf culture;
• A proven and impressive track record as a leader with the ability to build a team, motivate them, help them develop, and hold them accountable for the achievement of agreed upon organizational objectives;
• A strategic thinker with the capacity to help envision new programs, assess trade-offs, make decisions in the best interest of the University community, and with the follow through to execute those plans, even if the decisions are not always popular;
• Demonstrated ability to lead change management in an academic environment;
• Demonstrated ability to form and sustain productive relationships within the national and international Deaf community;
• Possesses knowledge of educational practices and trends in higher education with specific knowledge of the unique educational needs of people who are deaf and hard of hearing;
• A fair, collaborative, principled, and transparent leadership style that will succeed in an environment of shared governance, working closely and effectively with the cabinet and supporting input from faculty, students, administration, and staff; demonstrated ability to facilitate consensus and unify constituent groups;
• Demonstrated understanding of diversity issues at the student, faculty, and staff levels with a commitment to ensuring the values of diversity and inclusivity of a multicultural organization;
• Support and respect for the various communication choices of the campus community; and
• Resilience and stamina for the task at hand, the capacity to work effectively under pressure, personal grace and integrity in dealing with a broad spectrum of personalities.

Requirements:
PROFESSIONAL AND PERSONAL QUALITIES

Gallaudet University seeks in its new provost a leader, proficient in ASL, with a world view, the capacity to be forward thinking and lead change, extraordinary energy, and the extremely high level of personal integrity and ethics to inspire the University community to new levels of excellence. Candidates should have a history of organizational leadership, a capacity to build and cultivate financial support for the University and its programs, and accomplishments in creating and supporting a climate of community, understanding, integrity, and mutual respect. While no one candidate will possess all of them, the best candidates will bring many of the following qualifications and attributes:

• Possesses an earned doctorate or terminal degree and a record of scholarship, teaching, and service within higher education commensurate with appointment to full professor;
• Demonstrated ability to develop and articulate a detailed and compelling vision and the charisma and talent for effectively communicating this vision to University's constituents;
• Broad managerial skills and experience; detail oriented; a proven record of sound fiscal, organizational, and management practice;
• Proficiency in ASL with the ability to communicate clearly with deaf, hard of hearing, and hearing audiences; a deep understanding of deaf culture;
• A proven and impressive track record as a leader with the ability to build a team, motivate them, help them develop, and hold them accountable for the achievement of agreed upon organizational objectives;
• A strategic thinker with the capacity to help envision new programs, assess trade-offs, make decisions in the best interest of the University community, and with the follow through to execute those plans, even if the decisions are not always popular;
• Demonstrated ability to lead change management in an academic environment;
• Demonstrated ability to form and sustain productive relationships within the national and international Deaf community;
• Possesses knowledge of educational practices and trends in higher education with specific knowledge of the unique educational needs of people who are deaf and hard of hearing;
• A fair, collaborative, principled, and transparent leadership style that will succeed in an environment of shared governance, working closely and effectively with the cabinet and supporting input from faculty, students, administration, and staff; demonstrated ability to facilitate consensus and unify constituent groups;
• Demonstrated understanding of diversity issues at the student, faculty, and staff levels with a commitment to ensuring the values of diversity and inclusivity of a multicultural organization;
• Support and respect for the various communication choices of the campus community; and
• Resilience and stamina for the task at hand, the capacity to work effectively under pressure, personal grace and integrity in dealing with a broad spectrum of personalities.

Application Information:

TO APPLY

To learn more about Gallaudet University, please visit: www.gallaudet.edu. Gallaudet University has retained Isaacson, Miller, a national executive search firm, to assist in this search. Confidential inquiries, nominations, referrals, and resumes with cover letters should be sent in confidence to:
Michael Baer, Vice President and Director
Daniel Rodas, Vice President and Director
Natalie Leonhard, Senior Associate
Isaacson, Miller
1300 19th Street, NW, Suite 700
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-682-1504

GUProvost@imsearch.com

Electronic submission of materials is strongly encouraged.

Gallaudet University serves deaf and hard of hearing students from many different backgrounds and seeks to develop a workforce that reflects the diversity of its student body. Gallaudet is an equal employment opportunity/affirmative action employer and actively encourages deaf and hard of hearing persons, members of traditionally underrepresented groups, people with disabilities, women, and veterans to apply for open positions.

Positions Contingent on Funding
Gallaudet University is an equal opportunity employer/educational institution and does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, national origin, religion, age, hearing status, disability, covered veteran status, marital status, personal appearance, sexual orientation, family responsibilities, matriculation, political affiliation, source of income, place of business or residence, pregnancy, childbirth, or any other unlawful basis. Employees and recruiting sources are encouraged to refer qualified individuals from protected classes for available positions. Individuals who may have inquiries regarding the University’s policy and procedures or who may wish to file a complaint should contact the University’s EEO Office, Gallaudet University, 800 Florida Avenue, N.E., Washington, DC 20002-3695, 202-651-5462.
Employment Opportunities
About Gallaudet
Administration
Campus Photos
Clerc Center
Communications and Public Relations
Contact Us
Diversity
Employment Opportunities
Fast Facts
GU Press
Make an Online Gift
Maps & Directions
Mission & Goals
Sustainability
Visitors Center
Admissions
English Language Institute
Financial Aid
Global Education and Scholar Services
Graduate Admissions
Graduate Orientation
International Admissions
Professional Studies
Test Center
Undergraduate Admissions
Academics & Research
Undergraduate Majors and Programs
Graduate Programs
Professional Studies
Career Center
Academic Catalog & Course Info
General Studies Program
Honors Program
International Student Services
Library
Gallaudet Research Institute
Visual Language & Visual Learning
Campus Life
Athletics
Bison Shop (bookstore)
Campus Activities
Commencement
Food Services
Intramurals
Public Safety
Residence Life and Housing
Washington, D.C.
Tools & Resources
Bison
Daily Digest
Campus Directory
Subscribe to Gallaudet Alert
Help Desk
Maps & Directions
my.Gallaudet
People @ Gallaudet
Shuttle Bus Services
Gallaudet University | 800 Florida Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20002
Copyright © 2014 Gallaudet University
FacebookTwitterYouTube